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ROXANNE MESQUIDA
5min of reading

Roxane Mesquida has no fear. Spotted by Catherine Breillat at a young age, she went on to accumulate osé roles, side-by-side the likes of Isabelle Huppert or Vincent Cassel. Today a darling of independent directors, she has attempted the high jump from Greg Araki to Gossip Girl – and landed on her feet. On top of being Blair Waldorf’s new femme fatale of a rival, she is also working on a semi-autobiographical feature by independent filmmaker Frédéric Da, and enjoying the similitude between her new life in Los Angeles and her hometown Marseilles.

Did you always want to be an actress ?
No! I thought all actresses ended up committing suicide. But as a child, I kept being told I looked like Romy Schneider, and I became ob- sessed with her, I watched every one ofhefilms.Tome,sheisoneofthe best actresses in the world. But I didn’t know much about cinema, I grew up in a tiny village which didn’t have a movie house. I fell into it totally by accident, I was spotted taking a walk with my mom on a biking lane, and that’s where it all began.

Has cinema become a passion ?
It now is. Catherine Breillat in- troduced me to cinema, I discovered so much through her. At the time, I only cared for painting, for expressionism. Actors better be cinema enthusiasts – if you want to have a career, it’s impor- tant to know whom you want to work with.

What kind of career are you hoping for ?
I don’t dream of Oscars, but rather, working with Hungarian film maker Béla Tarr.And if I make money, I’ll invest it in producing short films and documentaries, one of my passions.

You come from indie cinema and now have a role in gossip girl – didn’t you fear losing credibility ?
No, Americans are less bothered with such things. Michelle Trach- tenberg, George Clooney, it’s no pro- blem to switch from one to the other. And it’s a great exposure for the smaller films I’m in: I’ve been in a ton of interviews and use the opportunity to talk about all my other projects.

Do you feel you are being type- casted as ‘the French girl’ ?
During the shoot of ‘Kaboum’, people didn’t use to say ‘the French girl’ but ‘that girl with the weird ac- cent”. I hope I can surpass the national stereotype, I’m happy with just being ‘foreign’.

Do you like fashion ?
I do. I love Margiela’s mad spirit, Miu Miu, and Dior too – but I can’t really say that right now, right? And as an actress, being interested in fashion is something that should be kept quiet, you’re expected to keep a serious image. If you’re the face of a cosmetic campaign, you’re generally advised to run around wearing glasses afterwards, to look more respectable – but in the US, you always actresses at fashion shows and no one seems to mind.

You now live in Los Angeles, is it only a career move or do you actually like it there ?
I feel I’ve fallen in love with Los Angeles. It reminds me of Mar- seilles, the nature, the pines, and the people, their flip-flops and their frien- dliness, always ready to help you.
I lived in New York before, and let’s just say it’s not a city for me. Life is so hard, and so are the people. I went to study acting and only lasted a few months. But what I like about the United States is the feeling that everything is pos- sible. In France everything takes ages, and you feel that you can only have a career in one domain. If you like more than one thing, you’re looked down on. I’m currently co-writing a book with my mother, I want to do a documenta- ry, I’m interested in Fashion, and I DJ once in a while. And for some people, that’s just too much.

Many of your films have a sexual element to them, why is that ?
Because I like sex! I’ve been on the cover of Playboy France and I’m generally not very body conscious. You often have actresses who get the scenarios re-written to avoid some scenes, who wrap up in bed sheets, and this attitude is all you notice.
It’s hard to tell a story without any sexual element in it at all.
And to be honest, have you ever covered up in a towel before going into the shower? That’s something you only see in movies.

Leather is the theme of the is- sue, what does the material evoke you ?
The poor cows? I think of clothes, especially leather jackets, which I have plenty of. There is so- mething everlastingly modern about leather. In Marcel Pagnol’s ‘Trilogie Marseillaise’, one of the leading cha- racters Marius wears a leather jacket, which hasn’t aged a bit. It’s weird, it’s something that has existed for decades, but you’ll always add a modern, rock touch by wearing it today.

Photography

Boris Ovini

Talent

Roxane Mesquida

Stylist

Jean Luc Francaise

Hair

Claudio Belizario

Make Up

Maria Olsson

Photo Assistant

Clement Dauvent
Sami Boccara

Set deco

Eli Serres

Thanks

Marine Artozoul
Camilla Morandi

Photography

Boris Ovini

Talent

Roxane Mesquida

Stylist

Jean Luc Francaise

Hair

Claudio Belizario

Make Up

Maria Olsson

Photo Assistant

Clement Dauvent
Sami Boccara

Set deco

Eli Serres

Thanks

Marine Artozoul
Camilla Morandi

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